POLITICS

The EFF Wants The ConCourt To Force Parliament To Discipline Zuma

Julius Malema says President Jacob Zuma must answer why "he lied to Parliament about having a bond".

14/02/2017 13:01 SAST | Updated 14/02/2017 15:34 SAST

The Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) will be heading to the Constitutional Court to force Parliament to institute disciplinary measures against President Jacob Zuma.

Party leader Julius Malema on Tuesday told reporters in Johannesburg that the organisation wanted the court to force Speaker Baleka Mbete's hand in implementing court judgments.

"We are now taking the matter to court to have Baleka compelled by the court to discipline Zuma. We want the court to compel Baleka to take disciplinary action because the court said Parliament failed when you didn't make sure the president abides by the remedial actions of the public protector," said Malema.

Malema said they wanted Zuma to account to the National Assembly over his bond that built parts of his homestead in Nkandla.

The Nkandla report, Secure in Comfort, was produced in March 2014 under Former public protector Thuli Madonsela. The report exposed how R246 million in public money had been used in security upgrades at President Jacob Zuma's private residence in Nkandla.

Zuma claimed that he had a home loan for the non-security upgrades. He said the loan was from VBS bank in Limpopo.

Malema maintained that Parliament must hold Zuma accountable.

"Zuma must come in front of a committee and answer why he lied to Parliament about having a bond. We have decided to approach the Constitutional Court directly. It would be wrong to expect a junior court to second-guess what actions should be taken," he said.

Malema said if Parliament cannot discipline Zuma then it must be dissolved. He said in any democracy failure to uphold a Constitutional Court ruling would have seen Parliament dissolved and early elections called. The Constitutional Court ruled that Zuma failed to uphold the Constitution.

"It can't be that after such a Constitutional Court ruling things end there," he said.

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