ENTERTAINMENT

These Are The Four Things You Should Do This Youth Day

Whether you choose to commemorate June 16 or not, here is something you can do.

16/06/2017 11:22 SAST | Updated 16/06/2017 11:22 SAST
Lerato Maduna/ Reuters
Children visit the Hector Peterson memorial in Soweto.

It may have been 41 years since the June 16, 1976 Soweto uprising, but South Africans still observe the day, now known as Youth Day.

The bravery of the learners who took to the streets to fight against the Bantu Education system as introduced by the apartheid government at the time. South Africans pay tribute to the class of 1976 by celebrating the legacy they left behind.

Those who lost their lives, whose numbers are disputed, are also commemorated on this day.

If you are not out and about yet, here are some of the places you can visit in commemoration of June 16.

1. Hector Petersen Museum:
The museum was built two blocks away from where 12-year-old Hector Petersen was shot and killed during the uprising. The museum covers the events leading up to, and during the uprising.

2. The Constitution Hill:
Constitution Hill is a living museum that tells the story of South Africa's journey to democracy. The site is a former prison and military fort.

3. Naledi High School:
The school, based on Soweto's Nape Street, played an important role at the start of the uprising in 1976.
Learners had gathered at Naledi High School to walk to Morris Isaacson High School in Jabavu. The plan was to gather at Orlando Stadium. Before they could get there, apartheid police arrived and shot and killed the learners.

4. If you can't go out, watch Sarafina:
It is an unspoken tradition for South Africans to watch Sarafina on June 16. The 1992 musical is based on the Soweto uprising, and follows the life of Sarafina, a black South African learner struggling for freedom during apartheid. The movement to make Afrikaans the official language in her school leads her to protest in the streets with her fellow students. You can watch it 8:30pm on eTV.