POLITICS

Derek Hanekom Is Ready To Respond To Mantashe

"I can confirm that I have started drafting my response letter to the secretary general."

27/08/2017 11:35 SAST | Updated 27/08/2017 11:35 SAST
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Former tourism minister Derek Hanekom says he has started drafting his letter of response to concerns raised by ANC secretary general Gwede Mantashe, but has refused to give details of its contents.

He was speaking at a youth forum on state capture held at the Apartheid Museum in Johannesburg on Saturday.

"I can confirm that I have started drafting my response letter to the secretary general. I address every concern of his, but I am not at liberty to tell you the contents," Hanekom told News24 on the sidelines of the event.

He said that the matter was an internal one and that, although it was not made public deliberately, it somehow went public.

He added that he would not be threatened by threats or letters.

He said that, although they have a national executive committee meeting coming up in September, nothing had been communicated to him about the matter of the disciplinary committee being bought up.

On August 18, Mantashe sent Hanekom a letter, giving him 10 days to explain why he should not be removed as chairperson of the disciplinary committee.

This after he made public statements which were seen to be jeopardising the national disciplinary committee, which Hanekom currently chairs.

Will stay in ANC
Hanekom denied allegations that he was trying to mobilise support for another party, reassuring audience members that all those who had spoken out in the ANC were not going to move to other parties.

Hanekom said he treated those who were doing the right things in the ANC as his leaders, naming heavily vilified Makhosi Khoza as someone who was an inspiring human being.

He also named Pravin Gordhan, Mcebisi Jonas, Umkhonto we Sizwe (MK) vets, Popo Molefe and Frank Chikane, among others, as people of integrity who South Africans could genuinely look up to.

Hanekom said that he was still fighting against state capture because watching the ANC crumble would be defeating the fundamentals of what made him join the organisation.

Axed deputy finance minister Mcebisi Jonas said that everyone needed to be united in holding the government to account when it comes to looting, corruption, social justice and state capture.

State capture, he said, was crippling key parts of our economy, including the mining sector, where there was not enough investment and a huge loss of jobs.

'State capture subverts, destroys economy'
He said that state capture could also be seen in many entities like Prasa, Tegeta, Eskom and the National Treasury, adding that the protection of these institutions was crucial.

"State capture subverts, undermines and destroys the economy. The battle isn't a temporary one, we need to rebuild afterwards," Jonas said.

He said the economy should be less reliant on foreign savings, as this allowed changes to always have a direct impact on us.

"[The economy] has been growing slowly for a long time, it's stuck in a low growth trap, complicated by the reality that our economy is based on a trade of commodities; and any change has a direct impact on the economy. We haven't diversified our economy enough to withstand changes in our global environment," he said.

Hanekom said that everyone should go and vote at the ANC's December electoral conference, but without manipulation.

"When we go to the December conference, we must elect a leadership that reignites the respect and confidence of the country. It must be responsive to the concerns of the ordinary. And if it fails, then the people of South Africa will have to express themselves in 2019," he said. -- News24