POLITICS

Ramaphosa: Be Patient, Maimane, State Capture Inquiry Will Come

Ramaphosa appeared in Parliament on Thursday for his last question session of the year.

16/11/2017 16:32 SAST | Updated 16/11/2017 17:14 SAST
Rogan Ward / Reuters

Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa has told DA leader Mmusi Maimane to "be patient", while the courts decide on whether President Jacob Zuma should appoint a judicial commission of inquiry into state capture.

Ramaphosa appeared in Parliament on Thursday for his last question session of the year.

For the second time this term, Maimane asked Ramaphosa in a supplementary question if he would support a judicial commission of inquiry appointed by the Chief Justice.

Former public protector Thuli Madonsela recommended in October 2015 that Zuma allow Chief Justice Mogoeng Mogoeng to select the judge to chair a commission of inquiry into state capture.

"We've addressed this matter over and over again. This matter is now in the courts," an exasperated Ramaphosa remarked.

The courts are deliberating on this matter, and all of us have said almost unanimously, that we would like to see a commission of inquiry appointed.

Zuma took Madonsela's State of Capture report on review, which was heard in the North Gauteng High Court in Pretoria earlier this month. He wants the court to set the report aside.

Ramaphosa reminded MPs that Zuma's legal team had promised in court that he would appoint a judicial commission of inquiry if the court instructed it do so.

Outcome of court case

"Let us hold back with our impatience and allow the courts to decide what should happen," Ramaphosa continued.

Once the courts determine what should happen, it will be all systems go. It's no use hurling out insults.

"I know that honourable Maimane may not have the necessary talent of being patient, and now I ask him to be patient and wait for the courts."

Zuma committed to setting up the commission of inquiry within 30 days if Madonsela's report is set aside.

The court has yet to set a date for a ruling, following closing arguments on November 1.

Zuma's legal team argued that setting up a judicial commission of inquiry was the president's prerogative only, and Madonsela's directive to let the Chief Justice elect the chair was unconstitutional.

-- News24