NEWS
23/01/2018 04:55 SAST | Updated 23/01/2018 04:56 SAST

Artist Gives Vintage Ads A Feminist Makeover By Swapping Gender Roles

“I went on to imagine a parallel universe, where roles are inverted and men are given a taste of their own sexist poison.”

Mr. Leggs, Eli Rezkallah/Plastik Studios 2018

One man is turning sexism on its head.

Eli Rezkallah, a 31-year-old artist and photographer from Beirut, Lebanon, recently created a photo series called "In a Parallel Universe."

The series takes sexist vintage ads from the mid-20th century and switches the gender roles.

Hardee's, Eli Rezkallah/Plastik Studios 2018

Rezkallah told HuffPost his goal with the series was to highlight the absurdity of gender inequality.

Van Heusen, Eli Rezkallah/Plastik Studios 2018

Rezkallah said he got the idea when he visited family in New Jersey last Thanksgiving. During dinner, Rezkallah had a hard time stomaching one particular conversation.

Chase & Sanborn, Eli Rezkallah/Plastik Studios 2018

"I overheard my uncles talk about how women are better off cooking, taking care of the kitchen and fulfilling 'their womanly duties,'" he told HuffPost. "Although I know that not all men think that way, I was surprised to learn that some still do."

Schlitz, Eli Rezkallah/Plastik Studios 2018

"So I went on to imagine a parallel universe, where roles are inverted and men are given a taste of their own sexist poison."

Alcoa, Eli Rezkallah/Plastik Studios 2018

Rezkallah told HuffPost that, after hearing his uncles' conversation, it became apparent "in today's world, we still have not achieved equality of the sexes yet."

He decided to highlight this point by using ads from the "Mad Men" era.

Hoover, Eli Rezkallah/Plastik Studios 2018

"Although those ads were made in the '50s and some people perceive them as vintage, the moment I heard my uncles' conversation, it felt that their essence is still present in the folds of today's modern social fabric," he said.

Chemstrand Nylon, Eli Rezkallah/Plastik Studios 2018

"I thought that the only way to make people like them understand what is wrong is by simply communicating it visually by simply reversing the gender roles."

Mr. Leggs, Eli Rezkallah/Plastik Studios 2018

Rezkallah told HuffPost that he considers himself a feminist and hopes that his photos will spark change.

Lux, Eli Rezkallah/Plastik Studios 2018

"I hope that people who are stuck in stereotypical gender roles imposed by patriarchal societies will be able to visually see the cracks in the limitation that those roles carry through this project," he said.

To check out more of Rezkallah's work, check out his website and his Instagram account.