LIFESTYLE
04/01/2018 15:40 SAST | Updated 05/01/2018 16:55 SAST

There IS Life After Failing Matric – Here Are Your Options

Don't throw in the towel – a failed matric doesn't have to mean your future is bleak.

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Below-par matric results –– or even failing matric –– is not the end of the world; you do still have options.

"While it might feel like the end of the world at the moment, clear heads and a pragmatic approach are required to make the right decisions for the future," says Fathima Razack, head of programme for the faculty of commerce at The Independent Institute of Education.

Although parents and guardians may feel deeply disappointed, they should know that their first words and reactions may leave a lasting impact.

Razack emphasised that there are options for learners who failed but are still determined to earn their National Senior Certificate -- and learners and parents alike must know of and explore these options.

They include:

  • Sitting for supplementary examinations
  • Sending papers for either a remark or recheck
  • Returning to school and reregistering for matric
  • Registering at another school to complete matric
  • Completing matric via distance learning

READ: Your Child Failed A Grade? It's Not The End Of The World

Those learners who passed, but didn't achieve the marks required for entrance into degree study, have the following options:

  • Sending papers for either a remark or recheck
  • Enrolling for a Higher Certificate at a higher education institution, which can give access to degree study
  • Enrolling for a Diploma, which can give access to degree study
  • Enrolling at a Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) college

ALSO READ: TVET Colleges Could Transform SA's Skills Shortage -- If Run Properly

Razack believes parents have a crucial role in ensuring that their children who fall in the above categories do not give up –– and this starts with how they respond.

"Although parents and guardians may feel deeply disappointed, they should know that their first words and reactions may leave a lasting impact."

"They should take stock and consider their unified position, so that the energy can be focused on the learner and their next steps," she added.

"If parents and learners can handle this situation maturely and strategise their next steps, instead of getting stuck in a catastrophising mindset, disappointing performance could be just the catalyst needed to propel a learner in a new and better direction, with more determination and resolve than before."