NEWS
10/01/2018 16:57 SAST | Updated 10/01/2018 16:58 SAST

Minister Manamela 'Happy' About How UJ Has Handled Walk-ins

Everything is under control at the university, apparently.

Deputy minister of higher education and training, Buti Manamela
Host Photo Agency / RIA Novosti
Deputy minister of higher education and training, Buti Manamela

Deputy minister of higher education and training, Buti Manamela, has said he is satisfied with how the University of Johannesburg has been handling registrations and walk-in applications.

Manamela did a walkabout at the university on Wednesday morning.

While he said the department did not want to allow walk-ins, he understood that some students preferred coming to the institution personally and should be given assistance if they decide to.

"If students appear here as walk-ins, they do serve them, and we are quite happy with what the university of Johannesburg has done," Manamela said.

University registrar, professor Kinta Burger, said admissions to UJ were competitive and the university could only admit a limited number of students.

"UJ's undergraduate applications for the 2018 academic year were recorded at close to 115,000 for 10,500 first-year spaces. The number of spaces available is in accordance with the formal enrolment plan approved by the department of higher education and training," she said.

However, Manamela's visit took a slight twist when a student from the EFF Student Command interrupted the Q&A session that journalists were having with the minister to highlight issue he believes should be addressed.

Zwelake Mahlamvu told Manamela that members of the EFFSC were harassed by private security while trying to assist students. He also complained about the online system, which he claimed has been giving students problems since Monday.

The EFF has been at the forefront of advocating walk-in registrations.

Mahlamvu's interruption led to a row between him and another student, who claimed that the EFFSC were actually harassing security.

The squabble was eventually settled by the minister saying: "I do not think there is a problem here."