NEWS
07/03/2018 07:40 SAST | Updated 07/03/2018 07:41 SAST

Microsoft Pledges To Help Teacher Who Drew Computer Screen On Chalkboard To Teach MS Word

An innovative Ghanaian teacher has become a social media sensation after pictures of him drawing features of a Microsoft Word processing window on a chalkboard

Owura Kwadwo Hottish

An innovative Ghanaian teacher has become a social media sensation after pictures of him drawing features of a Microsoft Word processing window on a chalkboard - to demonstrate to his students - went viral.

In some of the pictures that went viral, his students could also be seen drawing the window in their books.

According to This is Africa.com, Okwura Kwadwo had no computer to demonstrate Microsoft Word to his students, so he drew it on the chalkboard.

In a Facebook post, he wrote: "Teaching I.C.T in Ghana's school is very funny. I.C.T on the board paa. I love ma (my) students so have to do what will make them understand what am [I'm] teaching."

According to Quartz Africa, Kwadwo's efforts in teaching Information and Communications Technology (ICT) were admired by many, who could not believe the amount of dedication he had just to explain to his students how computers worked — without computers.

His creativeness soon grabbed the attention of a Cameroonian entrepreneur Rebecca Enonchong, who set out to find him and also sent a message to Microsoft Africa.

The computer giant immediately pledged to equip Kwadwo with a teaching device.

Microsoft Africa tweeted: "Supporting teachers to enable digital transformation in education is at the core of what we do. We will equip Owura Kwadwo with a device from one of our partners, and access to our MCE program & free professional development resources on education.microsoft.com."

Quartz Africa said that Kwadwo's had been teaching ICT for the past six years.

The report quoted Kwado as saying that although he had a personal laptop, he did not use it because the features differed from what was in the official syllabus, which required him to teach his students among other things parts of a system unit and monitor, the steps in connecting them and how to boot a computer with a desktop as their reference.

"[So] if you bring a charged laptop to class and just press the power button, then all of a sudden, everything will be on... [and that does not work]," he was quoted as saying.

He said that his school needed at least 50 computers to fully achieve its goal.

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